Forgotten or absorbed towns across South Carolina

lilburncock

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What was his name? My grandfather helped move houses and stores.
Glenn Moore.
He worked for the telephone company. They had to move and raise cables and wires so the buildings could be moved.
 

lilburncock

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Nov 24, 2003
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God, I know I’m being that guy, so apologies in advance. EVERYBODY in SC pronounces it Ellington but it is Ellenton. I actually googled it before posting because I have always pronounced it Ellington just like my father from Williston taught me.
Cool, learned something new today. Thanks
 

Bear_Rooster

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Abbeville
The dearth of textiles has never been redeemed by anything else in most such towns. Lancaster and Chester are pitiful. Lancaster County is booming in the Indian Land area but the city has deteriorated tragically.
I’ve never been to Lancaster nor Chester, but I can vouch for the dearth of textiles in the state. Belton, Honea Path, and other towns have been affected by the closing of textile mills. I worked at one while I was going to tech , and now it sits empty.
 
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Judson1

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I’m a gloverville product till I was 12.I remember going to the graniteville rocks games and my dad burning his clutch on the steap hill up by leavelle/mcCampbell.(I went there for 1 year) I didn’t have much but I had a great childhood.
Lived in Graniteville until 4 then moved to Gloverville. Lived on Back St. 2 streets above the elem. school.
Yeah that hill was steep!
 
Sep 23, 2019
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beyond the grave...
They've got a lot of conflicting ideas with people between Winnsboro and Fairfield County. Lots of old blood that refuses to give in to the progress that you're seeing in Blythewood and Chester. The big patch of trees you see between those two areas is Fairfield. So much potential. They've shot themselves in the foot numerous times, and that's not counting losing multiple industries such as the Mack truck plant. Then throw in the nuclear plant fiasco, and they've been all but doomed. It's a huge area as well.
True…one Walmart in the whole county and even Walmart said “screw this” and closed up shop
 
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jedi_mike

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Lived in Graniteville until 4 then moved to Gloverville. Lived on Back St. 2 streets above the elem. school.
Yeah that hill was steep!
When i went to gloverville elem, i rode my bike there. this is no lie but i lived across from hensons trailer park, and i didn't have to peddle not the first time all the way to school. Going home was a different story,lol.. I don't your age but this was in the early 80's Since you lived in the same neighborhood,did you happen to know a guy named jeffery holley by any chance? We were buddies till i moved a way. He lived a couple streets up from the school.
 

Judson1

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When i went to gloverville elem, i rode my bike there. this is no lie but i lived across from hensons trailer park, and i didn't have to peddle not the first time all the way to school. Going home was a different story,lol.. I don't your age but this was in the early 80's Since you lived in the same neighborhood,did you happen to know a guy named jeffery holley by any chance? We were buddies till i moved a way. He lived a couple streets up from the school.
He lived on Johnson St. in a two story brick. I lived one street down. His mom (Sandy??) was my babysitter for 4-5 years. Jeffrey was older than I by maybe 4 years or so. His sister Pam also kept me at our house some evenings when we were slightly older and my parents went out.
 
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TN-Gamecock

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Erwin, TN/Originally from Greer
There are some towns in UPSTATE SC that have suffered with the mills closing down.
But due to Greenville-Spartanburg-Anderson booming, most of those small towns are serving folks who can't buy in the more expensive areas.

The town that to me is seeing a major upswing is Gaffney. All of those distribution centers have opened up. I still buy real estate in Upstate SC and Gaffney has gone hot in that department.

The only towns to me that still suffer are places like Pacolet, Union, Clinton, Laurens, Chester, Lancaster....everywhere else is on FIRE!!!! IMO Greer is the hottest real estate market..with Travelers Rest on it's tail. The schools that Greer serves are all great schools too; Byrnes, Greer, Blue Ridge, & Riverside.

oh, when I was growing up in Blue Ridge, I had an uncle who went to work for Michelin in the 70's when they first located to the upstate. It paid well, and was really difficult to get hired there. You could know someone and still not get hired.

Today, you can drive down I-85 and there is a billboard for Michelin taking applications. Who would of ever thought MIchelin would have a hard time hiring folks?
 

king ward

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Aug 10, 1999
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Lancaster, SC
There are some towns in UPSTATE SC that have suffered with the mills closing down.
But due to Greenville-Spartanburg-Anderson booming, most of those small towns are serving folks who can't buy in the more expensive areas.

The town that to me is seeing a major upswing is Gaffney. All of those distribution centers have opened up. I still buy real estate in Upstate SC and Gaffney has gone hot in that department.

The only towns to me that still suffer are places like Pacolet, Union, Clinton, Laurens, Chester, Lancaster....everywhere else is on FIRE!!!! IMO Greer is the hottest real estate market..with Travelers Rest on it's tail. The schools that Greer serves are all great schools too; Byrnes, Greer, Blue Ridge, & Riverside.

oh, when I was growing up in Blue Ridge, I had an uncle who went to work for Michelin in the 70's when they first located to the upstate. It paid well, and was really difficult to get hired there. You could know someone and still not get hired.

Today, you can drive down I-85 and there is a billboard for Michelin taking applications. Who would of ever thought MIchelin would have a hard time hiring folks?
Have you been to Great Falls and Lockhart? Whitmire?
 
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Chris Gillespie

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When I was teaching in Fairfield, I'd have students who'd talk about their parents working there, and walking out with cart fulls. It was an accepted practice for the employees to just take what they desired. Didn't see anything wrong with it. Then had the audacity to complain when it closed. Walmart was even nice enough to try to relocate employees to other stores rather than lay them off.
 

jedi_mike

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He lived on Johnson St. in a two story brick. I lived one street down. His mom (Sandy??) was my babysitter for 4-5 years. Jeffrey was older than I by maybe 4 years or so. His sister Pam also kept me at our house some evenings when we were slightly older and my parents went out.
Small world.if it’s the same Jeffery,did he say anything about being clothes lined by a clothesline?me and him was riding our motorcycles and he decided to cut through someone’s yard and got it in the throat,had a small cut from ear to ear.That was something to see I’ll tell you now.I followed him home and his mom came out.we would’ve been around 10 or so.I wonder what he is up to.I haven’t seen him in almost 38 years.
 
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Sep 23, 2019
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beyond the grave...
When I was teaching in Fairfield, I'd have students who'd talk about their parents working there, and walking out with cart fulls. It was an accepted practice for the employees to just take what they desired. Didn't see anything wrong with it. Then had the audacity to complain when it closed. Walmart was even nice enough to try to relocate employees to other stores rather than lay them off.
Sounds like the way looting is viewed today...
 

BobbyBReloaded1975

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Meth is a real problem for rural and small town America. It's a problem everywhere, but more noticeable in small towns. I was in Walhalla recently for work and stayed at a motel in Seneca. There was a sign on the counter at the front desk that said, "If you live in Oconee, Pickens or Anderson County and want to rent a room you must place a $300 cash deposit with the clerk. It will be refunded when you check out after the room is inspected."

When I asked the clerk she said it was because of meth parties. One person rents a room and then invites his/her friends. They frequently tear up the room, punch holes in the walls and break the furniture.

We've got to find a way to get this under control.

I live in the Florida panhandle and it’s basically the meth capital of the world . A lot of little small towns between I-10 and the Alabama border and the meth trade has just wrecked those areas . Just about every other week there’s a report of an RV exploding out in the woods . Very very sad .
 
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76gintcock

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The story of Ellenton, New Ellenton, and the Savannah River Site is beyond belief.
The government buys a whole town for nuclear site, moves the whole town.

Pat Conroy included the story in The Prince Of Tides. Several critics called this element of the story, “typical Southern Fantastical Exaggeration and Hogwash!”
Conroy’s response was something like, “You Goddamn Yankee idiot snobs, look it up!!! It’s Ellenton and New Ellenton!”
As I recall, Prince of Tides also prominently featured Happy the Tiger. Most of you are probably too young to remember Happy the Tiger. Conroy got a lot of his stories from Alex Sanders, one of the funniest people I've ever met.
 

northGAcock

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Aug 17, 2003
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Columbia SC
I grew up in Allendale SC- built up in the 60/70s around HWY 301 &321… When the Interstates cut through it KILLED Allendale because there was suddenly no traffic coming through. That place is a third world country today. We moved there in like 79 when I was a baby and I watched the town literally crumble around us growing up… Allendale and Barnwell used to be real good football teams- for 2A- I haven’t kept up that much with 2A HS any more, but they have virtually no jobs or population growth there! My parents moved away years ago so I literally have no reason to visit and I DON’T.
....but Fairfax now that is another story all together. A fun filled day there is like a lifetime. (sorry I grew up in Hampton).......couldn't let that one go by.
 
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GamecockAppraiser

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Real Estate is cyclical. It typically follows the same pattern:

1. Growth
2. Equilibrium
3. Decline
4. Revitalization

If the population of the state continues to grow, there is a chance that some of the towns mentioned in this thread could make a comeback.
 

Gamecock Lifer

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....but Fairfax now that is another story all together. A fun filled day there is like a lifetime. (sorry I grew up in Hampton).......couldn't let that one go by.
I went to HS in Barnwell.. Hampton was a rival if I recall. We went to a FB game there one time when we were good and Hampton was not.. the home stands were so empty, we felt bad and went to sit on home side after half time! 😂
 

Gamecock Lifer

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Real Estate is cyclical. It typically follows the same pattern:

1. Growth
2. Equilibrium
3. Decline
4. Revitalization

If the population of the state continues to grow, there is a chance that some of the towns mentioned in this thread could make a comeback.
There needs to be reasonable accommodations, attractions, jobs, industry… To attract new people typically. I assure you Allendale has absolutely none of those qualities. Unless someone’s only criteria is “cheapest land I can find, I don’t even care if it smells like pig shit”, I cannot personally see their population grow much from new arrivals.
 

wycombecock

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Ulmer and the intersection of US 301 and US 321. When I was a kid (60s) This use to be a hoping area with a huge truck stop, motels and restaurants.

A few years back I took a job at Shaw AFB and drove home to Valdosta every other weekend, and on the drive back would take US 301 out of GA.

Only think left is a few buildings, truck stop has long be gone and I believe the motels are efficiency apartments (may be wrong).
 

Judson1

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Small world.if it’s the same Jeffery,did he say anything about being clothes lined by a clothesline?me and him was riding our motorcycles and he decided to cut through someone’s yard and got it in the throat,had a small cut from ear to ear.That was something to see I’ll tell you now.I followed him home and his mom came out.we would’ve been around 10 or so.I wonder what he is up to.I haven’t seen him in almost 38 years.
I remember that. Wasn’t sure if what kid it was but remember exactly what happened. The way it was told to me it sounded rather scary as a young kid.
Not sure what became of him. He went to Silver Bluff and we didn’t
 
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Jug Tavern Dawg

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Jun 23, 2001
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I grew up in Walhalla but left home for UGA in 1982 (ducking now). Anyway, even as a kid I was fascinated by Newry, an old mill village near Duke Power. My family has a history from waaaay back in the day both living there and working in the mill. I last drove through there about 5 years ago after my Mama's funeral, and it was pretty much unchanged from how I remembered in during the 70's. People do still live there (but not many), but the remains of the old mill are eerie. I heard there were plans to redevelop the area but I'm not sure if those ever came to fruition. As others have mentioned, the state (and the entire South for that matter) is peppered with old towns like this.

 
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jedi_mike

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I remember that. Wasn’t sure if what kid it was but remember exactly what happened. The way it was told to me it sounded rather scary as a young kid.
Not sure what became of him. He went to Silver Bluff and we didn’t
You should’ve seen it like I did.he literally got stopped instantly and his motorcycle keep going.if I had to guess,we was going atleast 20+mph.I had a little Honda 50 at the time.I miss the valley days.good times.
 

GoCocksFight2021

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Not really a town, but Spring Park near Lancaster. I loved that place as a kid. Sad to see it abandoned and going back to nature.
 

OldWiseCock

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Columbia
I live in the Florida panhandle and it’s basically the meth capital of the world . A lot of little small towns between I-10 and the Alabama border and the meth trade has just wrecked those areas . Just about every other week there’s a report of an RV exploding out in the woods . Very very sad .
That's terrible. It is dangerous in so many ways. A lawyer friend of mine said he has clients come to see him who appear to be in their 70s but are actually in their 30s. Most have lost their teeth.
 
Jan 24, 2005
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As a sales rep traveling the Southeast for 20 years, it was extremely interesting to watch the simultaneous rise & fall of small town America. Towns under 10K population seemed most prone to demise, whereas small cities with a "hook" - either a tourist draw or a large university, industrial, medical, or governmental presence, have experienced some degree of rejuvenation. There is a definite movement these days out of major cities back to the comfort, convenience, and security of smaller cities. This should bode well for many of the downtrodden downtowns that still have buildings of historical merit and could experience a revival, given the proximity of a "hook". I have seen it happen more & more of late. May it come to pass for all of them. Time will tell...
 

TN-Gamecock

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Erwin, TN/Originally from Greer
As a sales rep traveling the Southeast for 20 years, it was extremely interesting to watch the simultaneous rise & fall of small town America. Towns under 10K population seemed most prone to demise, whereas small cities with a "hook" - either a tourist draw or a large university, industrial, medical, or governmental presence, have experienced some degree of rejuvenation. There is a definite movement these days out of major cities back to the comfort, convenience, and security of smaller cities. This should bode well for many of the downtrodden downtowns that still have buildings of historical merit and could experience a revival, given the proximity of a "hook". I have seen it happen more & more of late. May it come to pass for all of them. Time will tell...
The booming small towns right now in the Upstate: Woodruff (who would have ever guessed), Easley, Pickens, Powdersville, Inman, Landrum, Campobello, Traverlers Rest, Moore, Mauldin, Marietta, Boiling Springs, Seneca, Lyman & Duncan.
 
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